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HomeIndiaShah to move contentious CAB in LS on Monday

Shah to move contentious CAB in LS on Monday

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New Delhi: Union Home Minister Amit Shah is all set to move the controversial Citizenship Amendment Bill on Monday, in the Lok Sabha. The matter is listed in the day’s business for the Lok Sabha.
This move comes days after the Union Cabinet last Wednesday approved the Bill. Responding to questions after the Cabinet meeting, Information and Broadcasting Minister Prakash Javadekar had said the Citizenship Amendment Bill takes care of India’s interests.
“I am confident that when the Bill’s provisions are announced, Assam, Northeast and the entire country will welcome it.” IANS has learnt that three northeastern states — Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland and Mizoram — where the Inner Line Permit (ILP) regime is applicable will be out of the purview of the CAB that created a political row in the area in the run-up to the 2019 general election. The ILP is an official travel document issued by the government of India to allow inward travel of an Indian citizen into a protected area for a limited period.
The politically sensitive Bill, which has already ruffled the feathers of the Opposition, will leave out tribal areas of Assam, Meghalaya and Tripura as well, sources said. These are the tribal areas where autonomous councils and districts were created under the 6th Schedule of the Constitution.
The Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, 2019 that seeks to provide Indian nationality to Hindus, Christians, Sikhs, Parsis, Jains and Buddhists fleeing persecution in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh, has already faced cold vibes from opposition with the Congress calling it “unconstitutional”.

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